Relationshipism and Human Connection

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Relationshipism and Human Connection: Explained by the BRMConnect Keynote Speaker

We are excited to announce this year’s keynote speaker at the World BRMConnect Conference, Danielle Hellebrand!
In this highlight article, Danielle shares her valuable take on Relationshipism and the future of business management, primarily driven by a strategic BRM capability and human connection.

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Emotional Intelligence - Internal Motivation

How to Talk Yourself to Success

Opinion /

What would you attempt if you knew failure was impossible?
When we respond to opportunities with positivity and motivation, our bodies release dopamine. The release of this prized chemical in the brain, known as the “reward drug”, naturally improves our mood, increases our focus, and boosts internal motivation.

BRMConnect 2019 Jeremy Byrne

Inspiring the World Through BRM: Jeremy Byrne

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As a firm believer in business relationship management’s ability to drive value, evolve culture, and build partnerships to satisfy purpose, Jeremy Byrne successfully provides value to almost every corner of his organization through a BRM capability.

Relationshipism Identifies Recognized Value

Relationshipism Identifies Recognized Value Through BRM

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A BRM capability provides invaluable benefit to both employees and their organization by promoting intangible value.
Since it can be difficult to understand the benefits of intangible value, one question commonly heard by BRMs is:
“How does Business Relationship Management (BRM) and ultimately, Relationshipism, identify recognized value for an organization?”

People Platform

Relationships and the Rise of the People Platform

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In the past, old hierarchies within business organizations traditionally viewed employees as a single, replaceable cog in an enormous machine; a means to an end. Value was placed solely on a predetermined business strategy to be achieved at the lowest possible cost. As a result, the cogs–meaning people–either fit into this strategy or not.

Social Skills - Emotional Intelligence

“Sure” Is a Funny Word!

Opinion /

“Sure” is a funny word. When used in conjunction with a possessive pronoun it indicates total conviction – i.e. “I am sure.”
However, when used outside of the sentence (and especially without a possessive pronoun), it indicates reticence, passivity or sarcasm.
So how do you know which way to interpret someone’s “sure”?

Changing Careers with Purpose

Thrive with Purpose when Changing Careers

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Throughout the 20th century, the concept of the career employee represented the gold standard for most of the workforce. If you could land a position with plenty of job security, you could stay in that role for years and work your way up the ranks of a single company.
Despite this, changing careers has always been a hallmark of professional life.

BRM Philosophy

Coming Full Circle with BRM as a Philosophy

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The dawn of the 21st century shed its rosy glow on a new way of thinking. Workers began to realize that killing themselves for shareholders they’d never meet and a bottom line they’d never see just didn’t make sense. The term “value” began to take on a different meaning. Notably, value expanded from tangible goods and money to include intangibles such as happiness, health, vacation-time, and purpose.

Emotional Intelligence Self-Regulation

How to Own Your Emotions using Self-Regulation

Opinion /

Emotions are simply tools that we use to process and understand information. Thus, when we allow ourselves that time to process, we can mindfully respond in a manner that provides mutual value through self-regulation.

DACH CoI

BRM Spotlight: Introducing the DACH Community of Interest!

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We are excited to announce a new addition to the Community of Interest (CoI) family, the DACH Community of Interest. Geographically focused on German-speaking countries, DACH provides a community-based platform for local business managers to connect and share their experiences while promoting a BRM capability.

Empathy Emotional Intelligence

How to Train Your Empathy for Deeper Connections

Opinion /

“Before you judge a man, walk a mile in his shoes.”
This age-old idiom has permeated society for generations, drawing its roots back to a Mary T. Lathrap poem in 1895. So, why does this century-old adage still echo with relevance today?

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